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NATIONAL POST ARTS

Agency sparks outrage with ‘Diana’ movie poster at site of Princess’s death 
Distastefully placed ads are nothing new, but people were outraged this week after a poster for the new Naomi Watts-starring “Diana” movie was placed at the site of the beloved princess’s death.
The poster was at the Pont de l’Alma, near the Flame of Liberty, which has served as a memorial to the Princess of Wales and is near the entrance to the tunnel in Paris where Diana died in a car crash in 1997.
The poster’s placement drew much criticism from “one of the Princess’ most trusted confidantes” Rosa Monckton, who told The Daily Mail: “To have made a film so speculative and as this is disgusting enough, but to then advertise it on the spot at which she died is despicable.”

Agency sparks outrage with ‘Diana’ movie poster at site of Princess’s death 

Distastefully placed ads are nothing new, but people were outraged this week after a poster for the new Naomi Watts-starring “Diana” movie was placed at the site of the beloved princess’s death.

The poster was at the Pont de l’Alma, near the Flame of Liberty, which has served as a memorial to the Princess of Wales and is near the entrance to the tunnel in Paris where Diana died in a car crash in 1997.

The poster’s placement drew much criticism from “one of the Princess’ most trusted confidantes” Rosa Monckton, who told The Daily Mail“To have made a film so speculative and as this is disgusting enough, but to then advertise it on the spot at which she died is despicable.”

Kate Middleton got a haircut! Read all about it here: http://natpo.st/V38Wi1

Royals with cheese at the Beaverbrook Art GalleryA lot of Canadians didn’t like it when Charles Pachter first showed them an image of their Queen atop a moose.“I’ve been exploring the whole post-colonial British thing in Canada ever since I can remember; 1973 was the first image I did of the Queen on a moose, which caused a scandal at the time,” says the Toronto artist, who has two cheeky takes on the House of Windsor currently showing at the Beaverbrook Art Gallery in Fredericton. Highnesses-in-Training Greet Monarch of the North, painted this year, depicts “Kate and Wills” meeting a moose. Laughing Monarchs is a 2008 example of Pachter’s Queen-and-moose theme. (Regarding the titles, he explains that as a schoolboy he learned that the moose was “monarch of the North.”)Terry Graff, curator and deputy director of the New Brunswick public gallery, says a pair of events set the stage for its show of Royal likenesses: the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton, and the restoration of a centuries-old Tudor scene rescued from an Irish castle.

Royals with cheese at the Beaverbrook Art Gallery
A lot of Canadians didn’t like it when Charles Pachter first showed them an image of their Queen atop a moose.

“I’ve been exploring the whole post-colonial British thing in Canada ever since I can remember; 1973 was the first image I did of the Queen on a moose, which caused a scandal at the time,” says the Toronto artist, who has two cheeky takes on the House of Windsor currently showing at the Beaverbrook Art Gallery in Fredericton. Highnesses-in-Training Greet Monarch of the North, painted this year, depicts “Kate and Wills” meeting a moose. Laughing Monarchs is a 2008 example of Pachter’s Queen-and-moose theme. (Regarding the titles, he explains that as a schoolboy he learned that the moose was “monarch of the North.”)

Terry Graff, curator and deputy director of the New Brunswick public gallery, says a pair of events set the stage for its show of Royal likenesses: the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton, and the restoration of a centuries-old Tudor scene rescued from an Irish castle.