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NATIONAL POST ARTS

'Where the Wild Things Are' author Maurice Sendak’s 85th birthday celebrated by Google
Maurice Sendak’s 85th birthday was celebrated with an animated Google doodle this Monday. The celebrated children’s book author, who died last May, was born June 10, 1928.

The animation is a relatively simple one by Google doodle standards — users click a small play button below Max, the protagonist from Sendak’s most famous work, Where The Wild Things Are, and the boy king starts walking around the world, soon followed by his Monster subjects.

Legendary film critic Roger Ebert dead at 70Roger Ebert, the most famous and most popular film reviewer of his time who become the first journalist to win a Pulitzer Prize for movie criticism and, on his long-running TV program, wielded the nation’s most influential thumb, died Thursday, the Chicago Sun-Times reported. He was 70.Ebert had been a film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times since 1967. He had announced on his blog Wednesday that he was undergoing radiation treatment after a recurrence of cancer.He had no grand theories or special agendas, but millions recognized the chatty, heavy-set man with wavy hair and horn-rimmed glasses. Above all, they followed the thumb — pointing up or down. It was the main logo of the televised shows Ebert co-hosted, first with the late Gene Siskel of the rival Chicago Tribune and — after Siskel’s death in 1999 — with his Sun-Times colleague, Richard Roeper. Although criticized as gimmicky and simplistic, a “two thumbs up” accolade was sure to find its way into the advertising for the movie in question. (Illustration: Kagan McLeod/National Post)

Legendary film critic Roger Ebert dead at 70
Roger Ebert, the most famous and most popular film reviewer of his time who become the first journalist to win a Pulitzer Prize for movie criticism and, on his long-running TV program, wielded the nation’s most influential thumb, died Thursday, the Chicago Sun-Times reported. He was 70.

Ebert had been a film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times since 1967. He had announced on his blog Wednesday that he was undergoing radiation treatment after a recurrence of cancer.

He had no grand theories or special agendas, but millions recognized the chatty, heavy-set man with wavy hair and horn-rimmed glasses. Above all, they followed the thumb — pointing up or down. It was the main logo of the televised shows Ebert co-hosted, first with the late Gene Siskel of the rival Chicago Tribune and — after Siskel’s death in 1999 — with his Sun-Times colleague, Richard Roeper. Although criticized as gimmicky and simplistic, a “two thumbs up” accolade was sure to find its way into the advertising for the movie in question. (Illustration: Kagan McLeod/National Post)

Edward Gorey, eerie illustrator, master of morbid humour, gets a posthumous Google birthday gift
Edward Gorey did not make it his business to be cheerful, despite the fact that a number of his titles are popular with children. “If you’re doing nonsense it has to be rather awful, because there’d be no point,” Gorey said of his work. “I’m trying to think if there’s sunny nonsense. Sunny, funny nonsense for children — oh, how boring, boring, boring. As Schubert said, there is no happy music. And that’s true, there really isn’t. And there’s probably no happy nonsense, either”

The macabre author and illustrator, who would have turned 88 today, was a fan of nonsense — his books and short stories are largely surreal, often completely without text, and are for their black humour popular among gothic subcultures. His illustration style was decidedly eerie: Gorey drew in black and white, mostly, anrd relied heavily on crosshatching method — his particular style, whimsical as it is chilling, significantly inspired filmmaker Tim Burton. (Tom Herde/Boston Globe Photo files; Google)

A brief, illustrated history of Quentin TarantinoFrom Reservoir Dogs to Django Unchained, U.S. director Quentin Tarantino has joined the canon of great filmmakers with his distinct — if hyper-violent — filmic style. We take a look at his filmography, in a handy illustrated format. Click through for some history on the Tarantino film in which each character stars! (Illustration by Steve Murray)

A brief, illustrated history of Quentin Tarantino
From Reservoir Dogs to Django Unchained, U.S. director Quentin Tarantino has joined the canon of great filmmakers with his distinct — if hyper-violent — filmic style. We take a look at his filmography, in a handy illustrated format. Click through for some history on the Tarantino film in which each character stars! (Illustration by Steve Murray)

Graphic: Stopping the DeadA statistical look back at the zombie kills and the weapon used in the Walking Dead series so far.

Graphic: Stopping the Dead
A statistical look back at the zombie kills and the weapon used in the Walking Dead series so far.

What can’t be published: A month-long effort to document a sexual assault led to a detailed, engaging piece too difficult to read Currently, Toronto women are living in fear. There are perpetrators of sexual assaults prowling multiple neighbourhoods. As the number of victims increase, I feel the familiar pulse of fear growing in the people around me, a frenzied hysteria disturbingly similar to that of that era I deeply researched while secluded in my cabin in the woods. And just like the newspaper reports of the ’80s and ’90s that surrounded the Scarborough Rapist, there is a slew of misguided commentary on how women can prevent themselves from being “easy targets.” Women are consistently asked to be “aware,” as if they aren’t already aware every hour of every day.Words are being used to dictate what women wear, how much they drink, what hours of the night they are allowed to travel in. It is more than 20 years since Paul Bernardo’s gruesome Scarborough attacks, and the conversation still hinges on what women should do to protect themselves. It has become tedium, this multiple-decade standard hum of complete disregard for a woman’s reality. When police “encourage women to be vigilant,” they fail to recognize that women are already living in a constant state of vigilance that is no way to live, under the ceaseless threat of violation, by a stranger or by someone they know. All these years and words and we have failed to learn that no amount of prescribed costume changing or behavioural policing will ever change that.(Illustration: Steve Murray/National Post)

What can’t be published: A month-long effort to document a sexual assault led to a detailed, engaging piece too difficult to read
Currently, Toronto women are living in fear. There are perpetrators of sexual assaults prowling multiple neighbourhoods. As the number of victims increase, I feel the familiar pulse of fear growing in the people around me, a frenzied hysteria disturbingly similar to that of that era I deeply researched while secluded in my cabin in the woods. And just like the newspaper reports of the ’80s and ’90s that surrounded the Scarborough Rapist, there is a slew of misguided commentary on how women can prevent themselves from being “easy targets.” Women are consistently asked to be “aware,” as if they aren’t already aware every hour of every day.

Words are being used to dictate what women wear, how much they drink, what hours of the night they are allowed to travel in. It is more than 20 years since Paul Bernardo’s gruesome Scarborough attacks, and the conversation still hinges on what women should do to protect themselves. It has become tedium, this multiple-decade standard hum of complete disregard for a woman’s reality. When police “encourage women to be vigilant,” they fail to recognize that women are already living in a constant state of vigilance that is no way to live, under the ceaseless threat of violation, by a stranger or by someone they know. All these years and words and we have failed to learn that no amount of prescribed costume changing or behavioural policing will ever change that.
(Illustration: Steve Murray/National Post)

Hooray for DollywoodThe Post’s Richard Johnson pushes aside his feelings on country music and roller coasters to survive a summer vacation at Tennessee’s ode to all things Dolly.

Hooray for Dollywood
The Post’s Richard Johnson pushes aside his feelings on country music and roller coasters to survive a summer vacation at Tennessee’s ode to all things Dolly.