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NATIONAL POST ARTS

Satan’s resemblance to Obama in History Channel’s The Bible ‘nonsense,’ showrunners say: natpo.st/135n4lm

Satan’s resemblance to Obama in History Channel’s The Bible ‘nonsense,’ showrunners say: natpo.st/135n4lm

Tagged with:  #Obama  #Satan  #The Bible  #Religion  #History
Former Canadian ambassador to Iran Ken Taylor pleased Ben Affleck thanked Canada after winning Best Picture for ‘Argo’The former Canadian ambassador to Iran who protected Americans at great personal risk during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis said Monday it was good to hear Ben Affleck finally thank Canada after Affleck’s film “Argo” won the Oscar for best picture.“Argo” came under criticism from some Canadians, including former ambassador Ken Taylor, who said he felt slighted by the movie because it makes Canada look like a meek observer to CIA heroics. Taylor says it minimizes Canada’s role in the Americans’ rescue.Former President Jimmy Carter appeared on television last week and said, “90 percent of the contributions to the ideas and the consummation of the plan was Canadian,” but the film “gives almost full credit to the American CIA.” (Leigh Vogel/Getty Images)

Former Canadian ambassador to Iran Ken Taylor pleased Ben Affleck thanked Canada after winning Best Picture for ‘Argo’
The former Canadian ambassador to Iran who protected Americans at great personal risk during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis said Monday it was good to hear Ben Affleck finally thank Canada after Affleck’s film “Argo” won the Oscar for best picture.

“Argo” came under criticism from some Canadians, including former ambassador Ken Taylor, who said he felt slighted by the movie because it makes Canada look like a meek observer to CIA heroics. Taylor says it minimizes Canada’s role in the Americans’ rescue.

Former President Jimmy Carter appeared on television last week and said, “90 percent of the contributions to the ideas and the consummation of the plan was Canadian,” but the film “gives almost full credit to the American CIA.” (Leigh Vogel/Getty Images)

Edward Gorey, eerie illustrator, master of morbid humour, gets a posthumous Google birthday gift
Edward Gorey did not make it his business to be cheerful, despite the fact that a number of his titles are popular with children. “If you’re doing nonsense it has to be rather awful, because there’d be no point,” Gorey said of his work. “I’m trying to think if there’s sunny nonsense. Sunny, funny nonsense for children — oh, how boring, boring, boring. As Schubert said, there is no happy music. And that’s true, there really isn’t. And there’s probably no happy nonsense, either”

The macabre author and illustrator, who would have turned 88 today, was a fan of nonsense — his books and short stories are largely surreal, often completely without text, and are for their black humour popular among gothic subcultures. His illustration style was decidedly eerie: Gorey drew in black and white, mostly, anrd relied heavily on crosshatching method — his particular style, whimsical as it is chilling, significantly inspired filmmaker Tim Burton. (Tom Herde/Boston Globe Photo files; Google)

Grimm’s Fairy Tales turn 200 — and they’re just as creepy today as they were in 1812Grimm’s Fairy Tales — the fairly disturbing and ever-iconic “Children’s and Household” stories about cannibals, death’s messengers and a girl without hands — first rolled off the presses in Germany 200 years ago. And Germany is excited.Like other Grimm tales, the version of Riding Hood best known to us isn’t the one that the Brothers Grimm originally penned. The brothers’ original tales were fables, yes, but they were meant to teach lessons and morals and often employed scare tactics to do so. For instance, in the Grimms’ original “Little Red Riding Hood” — also called “Red Cap” — the Big Bad Wolf eats both Riding Hood and her grandmother, and is cut open by a passing lumberjack. Some cleaned-up versions have the Wolf instead hiding Riding Hood and her grandmother in the closet.

Grimm’s Fairy Tales turn 200 — and they’re just as creepy today as they were in 1812
Grimm’s Fairy Tales — the fairly disturbing and ever-iconic “Children’s and Household” stories about cannibals, death’s messengers and a girl without hands — first rolled off the presses in Germany 200 years ago. And Germany is excited.

Like other Grimm tales, the version of Riding Hood best known to us isn’t the one that the Brothers Grimm originally penned. The brothers’ original tales were fables, yes, but they were meant to teach lessons and morals and often employed scare tactics to do so. For instance, in the Grimms’ original “Little Red Riding Hood” — also called “Red Cap” — the Big Bad Wolf eats both Riding Hood and her grandmother, and is cut open by a passing lumberjack. Some cleaned-up versions have the Wolf instead hiding Riding Hood and her grandmother in the closet.

Tubetype: A font that changed the city of LondonIn the midst of the First World War began one of the most iconic, enduring and best-loved fonts in the world: Edward Johnston’s type for the London Undergound. Within a few years, Johnston Sans would be visible not only at Elephant & Castle and Golders Green, but at all points where posters were pasted to walls. Edward Johnston’s work adorned every announcement, whether beautiful or grim (“The last northbound train has gone.”)Johnston was the man who defined London with his type, dominating the capital from the far western reaches of the Metropolitan line in Amersham to easterly Upminster on the District line. (Photo: Luke MacGregor/Reuters)

Tubetype: A font that changed the city of London
In the midst of the First World War began one of the most iconic, enduring and best-loved fonts in the world: Edward Johnston’s type for the London Undergound. Within a few years, Johnston Sans would be visible not only at Elephant & Castle and Golders Green, but at all points where posters were pasted to walls. Edward Johnston’s work adorned every announcement, whether beautiful or grim (“The last northbound train has gone.”)

Johnston was the man who defined London with his type, dominating the capital from the far western reaches of the Metropolitan line in Amersham to easterly Upminster on the District line. (Photo: Luke MacGregor/Reuters)

Just My Type: A short history of the ampersandMuch of what one needs to know about the history and beauty of a font  may be found in its ampersand. Done well, an “&” is not so much a  character as a creature, an animal from the deep. Or it is a character  in the other sense of the word, usually a tirelessly entertaining one,  perhaps an uncle with too many magic tricks.

Just My Type: A short history of the ampersand
Much of what one needs to know about the history and beauty of a font may be found in its ampersand. Done well, an “&” is not so much a character as a creature, an animal from the deep. Or it is a character in the other sense of the word, usually a tirelessly entertaining one, perhaps an uncle with too many magic tricks.