Hint: Use 'j' and 'k' keys
to move up and down

NATIONAL POST ARTS

"I is what I is and I’m not changing": Paula Deen broke down during her Today show interview with Matt Lauer on Wednesday — you can watch the full video here: natpo.st/10V7qIi

"I is what I is and I’m not changing": Paula Deen broke down during her Today show interview with Matt Lauer on Wednesday — you can watch the full video here: natpo.st/10V7qIi

Tagged with:  #Paula Deen  #Food Network  #Celebrity  #food
nationalpost:

Craving a Trudonut? How about a Justin Beaver Tail? We present some ‘Canadian icon’ doughnut suggestions for Tim HortonsWhen Canadian actor Jason Priestley, playing himself, said on the U.S. sitcom How I Met Your Mother that he had proudly crammed a Timbit into a strawberry vanilla doughnut, Tim Hortons responded with a fake ad for “The Priestley.” The National Post‘s Steve Murray takes a look at what other Canadians, and Canadian institutions, could be likewise honoured with their own delicious doughnut.

nationalpost:

Craving a Trudonut? How about a Justin Beaver Tail? We present some ‘Canadian icon’ doughnut suggestions for Tim Hortons
When Canadian actor Jason Priestley, playing himself, said on the U.S. sitcom How I Met Your Mother that he had proudly crammed a Timbit into a strawberry vanilla doughnut, Tim Hortons responded with a fake ad for “The Priestley.” The National Post‘s Steve Murray takes a look at what other Canadians, and Canadian institutions, could be likewise honoured with their own delicious doughnut.

Edulis named Canada’s best new restaurant by enRoute magazine
Toronto’s Edulis was one of six Toronto restaurants to make the list of ten, which also featured two eateries apiece from Calgary and Montreal. Read more here: natpo.st/SxEnSp

Edulis named Canada’s best new restaurant by enRoute magazine

Toronto’s Edulis was one of six Toronto restaurants to make the list of ten, which also featured two eateries apiece from Calgary and Montreal. Read more here: natpo.st/SxEnSp

Five important questions about Cinnabon’s new Pizzabon
1. Is there cheese on the inside, or is it just a doughy mound of dough made mostly of dough but with a bit of stuff on top?
2. Could one request a Cinnabon-Pizzabon hybrid? A Cinzabon?
3. Will there be pizza-sized Pizzabons, and could this open the door to pizza-sized Cinnabons?
4. Does Cinnabon plan to expand the “bon”-brand to any other common fast food items? Bagelbons, for instance? Burgerbons? Burritobons?
5. Will Cinnabon franchises be extending their hours to, say, 3 a.m. to serve the Pizzabon? Because really, Cinnabon, this thing is gonna look like the Holy Grail at 3 a.m. to a lot of people.

Five important questions about Cinnabon’s new Pizzabon

1. Is there cheese on the inside, or is it just a doughy mound of dough made mostly of dough but with a bit of stuff on top?

2. Could one request a Cinnabon-Pizzabon hybrid? A Cinzabon?

3. Will there be pizza-sized Pizzabons, and could this open the door to pizza-sized Cinnabons?

4. Does Cinnabon plan to expand the “bon”-brand to any other common fast food items? Bagelbons, for instance? Burgerbons? Burritobons?

5. Will Cinnabon franchises be extending their hours to, say, 3 a.m. to serve the Pizzabon? Because really, Cinnabon, this thing is gonna look like the Holy Grail at 3 a.m. to a lot of people.

Tagged with:  #Cinnabon  #Pizzabon  #food  #fast food
Meet Jean Paul Lourdes, the most famous chef you’ve never heard of (or seen)
He’s refused to be photographed (he’s somewhat shy and humble and says it’s about the food, not him), so I’ll briefly describe the man: Tall, baby-faced, broad-shouldered and thick-necked, almost like a prep school wrestler. He’s also got some fascinating tattoos — not your regular cheffy ones of pigs and pies. Instead, Lourdes’ tats are small, quiet and symbolic — eyelids tattooed with open eyes, a red teardrop or two rolling down the cheek. When I jovially ask if he’s enjoying Toronto, he gives me a look that suggests I’ve accused him of buying a platinum season’s pass to Canada’s Wonderland and taking endless loops on the Leviathan. “I’m here to work,” he says.

Meet Jean Paul Lourdes, the most famous chef you’ve never heard of (or seen)

He’s refused to be photographed (he’s somewhat shy and humble and says it’s about the food, not him), so I’ll briefly describe the man: Tall, baby-faced, broad-shouldered and thick-necked, almost like a prep school wrestler. He’s also got some fascinating tattoos — not your regular cheffy ones of pigs and pies. Instead, Lourdes’ tats are small, quiet and symbolic — eyelids tattooed with open eyes, a red teardrop or two rolling down the cheek. When I jovially ask if he’s enjoying Toronto, he gives me a look that suggests I’ve accused him of buying a platinum season’s pass to Canada’s Wonderland and taking endless loops on the Leviathan. “I’m here to work,” he says.

Tagged with:  #Food  #Cooking  #Chefs  #Celebrity CHefs
As a former baseball player, Josh Chetwynd has had his share of hot dogs. The 40-year-old Denver-based journalist leaves the ballpark behind, though, for his new book, How the Hot Dog Found its Bun, which features 75 short essays tracing the creation of everything from Caesar salad to whipped cream. Chetwynd spoke with the Post’s Melissa Leong about his smorgasbord of origin stories.

As a former baseball player, Josh Chetwynd has had his share of hot dogs. The 40-year-old Denver-based journalist leaves the ballpark behind, though, for his new book, How the Hot Dog Found its Bun, which features 75 short essays tracing the creation of everything from Caesar salad to whipped cream. Chetwynd spoke with the Post’s Melissa Leong about his smorgasbord of origin stories.

Tagged with:  #Food  #Books

The eater’s and drinker’s guide to New Orleans

Whether you’re in the city to drink your face off or nosh till you drop, Barry Hertz has the guide to Nawlin’s tailored to your every need!

Deconstructed Dish: A donair affairPerhaps the most exciting addition to the Toronto food landscape, for transplanted Haligonians at least, is the donair. The shaved meat wrap’s origins stem from some combination of Turkish, Lebanese and Greek cuisine (the preparation is much like a gyro), but the precise history is shrouded in mystery.

Deconstructed Dish: A donair affair
Perhaps the most exciting addition to the Toronto food landscape, for transplanted Haligonians at least, is the donair. The shaved meat wrap’s origins stem from some combination of Turkish, Lebanese and Greek cuisine (the preparation is much like a gyro), but the precise history is shrouded in mystery.

Kitchen nightmares: Rachel Herz unravels mystery of repulsion in That’s Disgusting
When European colonists discovered lobster in the 1600s, it was considered food for the poor. The sea vermin was used as fish bait and fertilizer and fed to orphans, slaves and prisoners. Servants rebelled. Massachusetts, eventually, passed a law forbidding the serving of lobster to prisoners and servants more than twice a week. “A daily lobster dinner was deemed cruel and unusual punishment,” Rachel Herz writes in her book, That’s Disgusting: Unraveling the Mysteries of Repulsion. Today, lobster is a decadent dish reserved for special occasions, say a birthday or anniversary or a last meal on death row.

Culture defines what is disgusting. For example, Herz, an expert on the psychology of smell and emotion at Brown University, grew up in Montreal, where poutine is popular; however, the slimy, cheesy treat might be considered gross in Asia where some people think cheese is repulsive.