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NATIONAL POST ARTS

The literary life of R.A. Dickey
When already-legendary Blue Jays pitcher Dickey was in Grade 7, a teacher submitted a poem of his to a statewide contest, which he ended up winning. At the time he was struggling with the ramifications of abuse, and the success buoyed him: “From then on, I knew that I wanted to write. Unpacking literature and writing for me came very natural.” READ MORE: natpo.st/13AS6BU

The literary life of R.A. Dickey

When already-legendary Blue Jays pitcher Dickey was in Grade 7, a teacher submitted a poem of his to a statewide contest, which he ended up winning. At the time he was struggling with the ramifications of abuse, and the success buoyed him: “From then on, I knew that I wanted to write. Unpacking literature and writing for me came very natural.” READ MORE: natpo.st/13AS6BU

Fifty Shades author E.L. James to release Inner Goddess, a ‘bonded’ (GET IT?) leather journal: http://natpo.st/12IABPq

Fifty Shades author E.L. James to release Inner Goddess, a ‘bonded’ (GET IT?) leather journal: http://natpo.st/12IABPq

Edward Gorey, eerie illustrator, master of morbid humour, gets a posthumous Google birthday gift
Edward Gorey did not make it his business to be cheerful, despite the fact that a number of his titles are popular with children. “If you’re doing nonsense it has to be rather awful, because there’d be no point,” Gorey said of his work. “I’m trying to think if there’s sunny nonsense. Sunny, funny nonsense for children — oh, how boring, boring, boring. As Schubert said, there is no happy music. And that’s true, there really isn’t. And there’s probably no happy nonsense, either”

The macabre author and illustrator, who would have turned 88 today, was a fan of nonsense — his books and short stories are largely surreal, often completely without text, and are for their black humour popular among gothic subcultures. His illustration style was decidedly eerie: Gorey drew in black and white, mostly, anrd relied heavily on crosshatching method — his particular style, whimsical as it is chilling, significantly inspired filmmaker Tim Burton. (Tom Herde/Boston Globe Photo files; Google)

Prose in the nude: Canadian authors get naked for Bare It For Books calendarIt’s often said that authors bare their souls on the page. Now, some of Canada’s most successful writers are baring a little bit more for charity.Bare It For Books is the brainchild of Allegra Young, a classical music producer, and Amanda Leduc, an author who first proposed a calendar featuring Canadian authors in the buff on Twitter this past summer.“It’s a risky venture,” Leduc says. “A naked calendar isn’t something that you see everyday.” (Shelagh Howard)

Prose in the nude: Canadian authors get naked for Bare It For Books calendar
It’s often said that authors bare their souls on the page. Now, some of Canada’s most successful writers are baring a little bit more for charity.

Bare It For Books is the brainchild of Allegra Young, a classical music producer, and Amanda Leduc, an author who first proposed a calendar featuring Canadian authors in the buff on Twitter this past summer.

“It’s a risky venture,” Leduc says. “A naked calendar isn’t something that you see everyday.” (Shelagh Howard)

Anne of Green Gables gets a sexy makeover, blond dye-job for new edition — and Canadian fans are not amusedA new image of Canada’s most beloved literary orphan has Canadians seeing red, but not where they’re supposed to.A new edition of Anne of Green Gables depicts the notoriously youthful and ruddy-headed heroine as a curvaceous blond teen, sparking a fierce backlash from scholars and casual readers alike.Critics derided the cover — which shows the heroine reclining against a hay stack, clad in a plaid shirt and smiling suggestively — saying it is a far cry from the feisty, 19th-century 11-year-old brought to life in the pages of L.M. Montgomery’s classic series of novels. (Amazon.com; Postmedia News files)

Anne of Green Gables gets a sexy makeover, blond dye-job for new edition — and Canadian fans are not amused
A new image of Canada’s most beloved literary orphan has Canadians seeing red, but not where they’re supposed to.

A new edition of Anne of Green Gables depicts the notoriously youthful and ruddy-headed heroine as a curvaceous blond teen, sparking a fierce backlash from scholars and casual readers alike.

Critics derided the cover — which shows the heroine reclining against a hay stack, clad in a plaid shirt and smiling suggestively — saying it is a far cry from the feisty, 19th-century 11-year-old brought to life in the pages of L.M. Montgomery’s classic series of novels. (Amazon.com; Postmedia News files)

Grimm’s Fairy Tales turn 200 — and they’re just as creepy today as they were in 1812Grimm’s Fairy Tales — the fairly disturbing and ever-iconic “Children’s and Household” stories about cannibals, death’s messengers and a girl without hands — first rolled off the presses in Germany 200 years ago. And Germany is excited.Like other Grimm tales, the version of Riding Hood best known to us isn’t the one that the Brothers Grimm originally penned. The brothers’ original tales were fables, yes, but they were meant to teach lessons and morals and often employed scare tactics to do so. For instance, in the Grimms’ original “Little Red Riding Hood” — also called “Red Cap” — the Big Bad Wolf eats both Riding Hood and her grandmother, and is cut open by a passing lumberjack. Some cleaned-up versions have the Wolf instead hiding Riding Hood and her grandmother in the closet.

Grimm’s Fairy Tales turn 200 — and they’re just as creepy today as they were in 1812
Grimm’s Fairy Tales — the fairly disturbing and ever-iconic “Children’s and Household” stories about cannibals, death’s messengers and a girl without hands — first rolled off the presses in Germany 200 years ago. And Germany is excited.

Like other Grimm tales, the version of Riding Hood best known to us isn’t the one that the Brothers Grimm originally penned. The brothers’ original tales were fables, yes, but they were meant to teach lessons and morals and often employed scare tactics to do so. For instance, in the Grimms’ original “Little Red Riding Hood” — also called “Red Cap” — the Big Bad Wolf eats both Riding Hood and her grandmother, and is cut open by a passing lumberjack. Some cleaned-up versions have the Wolf instead hiding Riding Hood and her grandmother in the closet.

Live Chat: How do you self-publish a novel? Ask the experts!Everything you’ve always wanted to know about self-publishing, but had no idea who to ask.

Live Chat: How do you self-publish a novel? Ask the experts!
Everything you’ve always wanted to know about self-publishing, but had no idea who to ask.

A team of genetic researchers in Texas have concluded that the legendary forest-dwelling ape-man, also known as the Sasquatch and, in colder climes, the Yeti, is indeed real. DNA testing has revealed the beast is the result of a human woman coupling with a primate some 15,000 years ago. When reached for comment through his official biographer, Graham Roumieu, Bigfoot had a few things to say: natpo.st/StM8cS

A team of genetic researchers in Texas have concluded that the legendary forest-dwelling ape-man, also known as the Sasquatch and, in colder climes, the Yeti, is indeed real. DNA testing has revealed the beast is the result of a human woman coupling with a primate some 15,000 years ago. When reached for comment through his official biographer, Graham Roumieu, Bigfoot had a few things to say: natpo.st/StM8cS

Tagged with:  #Bigfoot  #Science  #Books  #Graham Roumieu
Film Review: Life of Pi
Based on Yann Martel’s extraordinary, 2001 Booker-winning novel, Life of Pi has been in development so long that film has grown another dimension in the meantime. Actors, writers and directors have come and gone. At one point, M. Night Shyamalan was attached. Then (twist!) he left. The good news is it was worth the wait. Read the full review here: natpo.st/Y2ysdO

Film Review: Life of Pi

Based on Yann Martel’s extraordinary, 2001 Booker-winning novel, Life of Pi has been in development so long that film has grown another dimension in the meantime. Actors, writers and directors have come and gone. At one point, M. Night Shyamalan was attached. Then (twist!) he left. The good news is it was worth the wait. Read the full review here: natpo.st/Y2ysdO

Tagged with:  #Movies  #Books  #Life of Pi  #Yann Martel  #Films