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NATIONAL POST ARTS

Father knows best in Darth Vader and Son
Darth Vader was a pretty good father — at least he wanted to be. Think about it: He’s only prevented from attending the birth of his children by Obi-Wan Kenobi. He asks Luke to “rule the galaxy as father and son.” And he throws Emperor Palpatine down the Death Star’s reactor shaft to stop him from killing his son.

“I would think that Vader would be, in a way, a good father that would raise a bad person,” cartoonist Jeffrey Brown says. “He would be one of those fathers who’s very stern — not very warm and cuddly, but trying to impart his knowledge and values on his child. I think that most people would think that imparting your values on your children is an important part of parenting, but when your values are, you know, killing people, [it’s] maybe not so good.” (Jeffrey Brown/Chronicle Books)

Jedi Knights at the museum: Unleash your inner child, you can, at Star Wars IdentitiesTwo years in the making by Montreal’s X3 Productions, the exhibition at Montreal’s Science Centre is partly an educational display aimed at explaining and exploring the concept of identity, and partly a shrine to some 200 props, costumes, and “artifacts” from George Lucas’s two Star Wars film trilogies. In an attempt to thread both aspects together, the museum uses high-tech bracelets to track visitors’ choices throughout the exhibition, so that everyone can create a Star Wars-esque character from scratch.Each visitor picks a species (e.g., human, Wookiee, Ewok), genetic traits, personality traits, a mentor and so on, ending up with one of 50 million-odd possible personalized “heroes.” (Illustration by Andrew Barr)

Jedi Knights at the museum: Unleash your inner child, you can, at Star Wars Identities
Two years in the making by Montreal’s X3 Productions, the exhibition at Montreal’s Science Centre is partly an educational display aimed at explaining and exploring the concept of identity, and partly a shrine to some 200 props, costumes, and “artifacts” from George Lucas’s two Star Wars film trilogies. In an attempt to thread both aspects together, the museum uses high-tech bracelets to track visitors’ choices throughout the exhibition, so that everyone can create a Star Wars-esque character from scratch.

Each visitor picks a species (e.g., human, Wookiee, Ewok), genetic traits, personality traits, a mentor and so on, ending up with one of 50 million-odd possible personalized “heroes.” (Illustration by Andrew Barr)