NATIONAL POST ARTS

Legendary film critic Roger Ebert dead at 70Roger Ebert, the most famous and most popular film reviewer of his time who become the first journalist to win a Pulitzer Prize for movie criticism and, on his long-running TV program, wielded the nation’s most influential thumb, died Thursday, the Chicago Sun-Times reported. He was 70.Ebert had been a film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times since 1967. He had announced on his blog Wednesday that he was undergoing radiation treatment after a recurrence of cancer.He had no grand theories or special agendas, but millions recognized the chatty, heavy-set man with wavy hair and horn-rimmed glasses. Above all, they followed the thumb — pointing up or down. It was the main logo of the televised shows Ebert co-hosted, first with the late Gene Siskel of the rival Chicago Tribune and — after Siskel’s death in 1999 — with his Sun-Times colleague, Richard Roeper. Although criticized as gimmicky and simplistic, a “two thumbs up” accolade was sure to find its way into the advertising for the movie in question. (Illustration: Kagan McLeod/National Post)

Legendary film critic Roger Ebert dead at 70
Roger Ebert, the most famous and most popular film reviewer of his time who become the first journalist to win a Pulitzer Prize for movie criticism and, on his long-running TV program, wielded the nation’s most influential thumb, died Thursday, the Chicago Sun-Times reported. He was 70.

Ebert had been a film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times since 1967. He had announced on his blog Wednesday that he was undergoing radiation treatment after a recurrence of cancer.

He had no grand theories or special agendas, but millions recognized the chatty, heavy-set man with wavy hair and horn-rimmed glasses. Above all, they followed the thumb — pointing up or down. It was the main logo of the televised shows Ebert co-hosted, first with the late Gene Siskel of the rival Chicago Tribune and — after Siskel’s death in 1999 — with his Sun-Times colleague, Richard Roeper. Although criticized as gimmicky and simplistic, a “two thumbs up” accolade was sure to find its way into the advertising for the movie in question. (Illustration: Kagan McLeod/National Post)

  1. mikemeltzer reblogged this from nationalpost
  2. jennhardeen reblogged this from nationalpost
  3. mcgarrygirl78 reblogged this from krazykat404
  4. hcknloopr reblogged this from politi-gal and added:
    RIP to a man who always gave me hope and filled me with inspiration. Roger Ebert’s voice was one of a kind, and it will...
  5. chandlerhandle reblogged this from diarrheaworldstarhiphop
  6. mrgulogulo reblogged this from nparts
  7. ahmenophus reblogged this from imnotnormalimextraordinary
  8. imnotnormalimextraordinary reblogged this from nationalpost
  9. ichooseupeetachu reblogged this from alwayscaptainswan
  10. somebody-loves-us reblogged this from nationalpost
  11. krazykat404 reblogged this from politi-gal
  12. alwayscaptainswan reblogged this from nationalpost
  13. iamcamdon reblogged this from diarrheaworldstarhiphop
  14. sirknightofkawaii reblogged this from diarrheaworldstarhiphop
  15. princesszangiev reblogged this from diarrheaworldstarhiphop and added:
    Ha ha good
  16. diarrheaworldstarhiphop reblogged this from nationalpost and added:
    "Videogames… still… aren’t….. art… bweggh" RIP in peace
  17. yukithemeddler reblogged this from scholarly-rhythm and added:
    Two-thumbs-up will never mean the same thing.
  18. scholarly-rhythm reblogged this from nationalpost and added:
    Oh, wow…I think we all need to take a moment of silence.
  19. scullywhereareyou reblogged this from nationalpost