NATIONAL POST ARTS

Royals with cheese at the Beaverbrook Art GalleryA lot of Canadians didn’t like it when Charles Pachter first showed them an image of their Queen atop a moose.“I’ve been exploring the whole post-colonial British thing in Canada ever since I can remember; 1973 was the first image I did of the Queen on a moose, which caused a scandal at the time,” says the Toronto artist, who has two cheeky takes on the House of Windsor currently showing at the Beaverbrook Art Gallery in Fredericton. Highnesses-in-Training Greet Monarch of the North, painted this year, depicts “Kate and Wills” meeting a moose. Laughing Monarchs is a 2008 example of Pachter’s Queen-and-moose theme. (Regarding the titles, he explains that as a schoolboy he learned that the moose was “monarch of the North.”)Terry Graff, curator and deputy director of the New Brunswick public gallery, says a pair of events set the stage for its show of Royal likenesses: the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton, and the restoration of a centuries-old Tudor scene rescued from an Irish castle.

Royals with cheese at the Beaverbrook Art Gallery
A lot of Canadians didn’t like it when Charles Pachter first showed them an image of their Queen atop a moose.

“I’ve been exploring the whole post-colonial British thing in Canada ever since I can remember; 1973 was the first image I did of the Queen on a moose, which caused a scandal at the time,” says the Toronto artist, who has two cheeky takes on the House of Windsor currently showing at the Beaverbrook Art Gallery in Fredericton. Highnesses-in-Training Greet Monarch of the North, painted this year, depicts “Kate and Wills” meeting a moose. Laughing Monarchs is a 2008 example of Pachter’s Queen-and-moose theme. (Regarding the titles, he explains that as a schoolboy he learned that the moose was “monarch of the North.”)

Terry Graff, curator and deputy director of the New Brunswick public gallery, says a pair of events set the stage for its show of Royal likenesses: the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton, and the restoration of a centuries-old Tudor scene rescued from an Irish castle.

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